Creeps

Andrew Searle

In this hilarious stand-up comedy show, up-and-coming comedians Nat Harris and Elizabeth Davie discuss navigating life as a late-twenty-something.
Creeps

There’s a certain period in our late twenties/early thirties where, out of nowhere, friends start to ‘settle down’. Suddenly the mate you could always call for a trashy Saturday night is too busy with bathroom renovations, or the friend who would call you at 3am after having – yet another – relationship drama is planning their wedding and popping out a second baby. Those left on the outer – in the strange limbo-land between being a twenty-something and becoming a ‘fully-fledged human being’ – can be made to feel like an anomaly, a weirdo or a ‘creep’. This is largely the overarching theme in Natalie Harris and Elizabeth Davie’s hilarious new stand-up comedy show ‘Creeps’.

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The two entered in true ‘creep’ fashion – subtly stroking audience member’s hair as they approached the stage. After they delivered a mock in-flight safety spiel, Nat Harris commenced the first solo set of the evening. Harris has appeared on various ABC TV productions including Twentysomething and she surely shares DNA with the star of that show, Jess Harris. The two both have a knack for delivering self-deprecating humour based on sharp, relatable observations. She discussed topics ubiquitous to those who are approaching the 30 mark – Tindr, overseas travel, working in hospitality and the realisation that life doesn’t always turn out exactly as planned.

Davie’s set followed soon after. She began by divulging that she had recently seen a life coach who gave her some interesting food for thought – ‘you are the composite of the people you surrounds yourself with’. She went on to analyse the people who have made her ‘the kind of person who needs a life coach’ – with hilarious results. Because of the more focussed approach to writing and faster pace, Davie’s set was the stronger of the two. However, both comedians showed real comedic talent, stage presence and likeability.

During the safety spiel at the beginning of the show, Davie joked ‘who are we kidding, you guys have come to see two unknowns in a Fringe show – you live to gamble, right?’ In this case, the gamble paid off. Check this show out while you can, as I expect these two ‘creeps’ won’t remain unknown for too much longer.

Rating: 3 ½ out of 5 stars

Creeps

Natalie Harris and Elizabeth Davie

The Provincial Hotel, Brunswick St
Melbourne Fringe Festival
www.melbournefringe.com.au
17 - 28 September

What the stars mean?
  • Five stars: Exceptional, unforgettable, a must see
  • Four and a half stars: Excellent, definitely worth seeing
  • Four stars: Accomplished and engrossing but not the best of its kind
  • Three and a half stars: Good, clever, well made, but not brilliant
  • Three stars: Solid, enjoyable, but unremarkable or flawed
  • Two and half stars: Neither good nor bad, just adequate
  • Two stars: Not without its moments, but ultimately unsuccessful
  • One star: Awful, to be avoided
  • Zero stars: Genuinely dreadful, bad on every level

About the author

Andrew Searle is an aspiring writer by night, and a primary school teacher by day. In addition to Arts Hub, he contributes to OutinPerth magazine. Having spent 7 years gallivanting in Melbourne, Andrew holds double degree in English Literature and Performing Arts from Monash University and recently completed his Dip Ed at ECU Mt Lawley. He is passionate about art in all of its forms. He also loves animals and udon soup.